If radiation causes cancer why is it used to treat cancer?

How Radiation Therapy Works for Cancer. At high doses, radiation therapy kills cancer cells or slows their growth by damaging DNA.

If radiation causes cancer why is it used to treat cancer?

How Radiation Therapy Works for Cancer. At high doses, radiation therapy kills cancer cells or slows their growth by damaging DNA. Cancer cells whose DNA is irreparably damaged stop dividing or die. When damaged cells die, the body breaks them down and removes them.

If a person's cancer has returned (relapsed), radiation may be used to treat cancer or to treat symptoms caused by advanced cancer. The use of radiation after relapse depends on many factors. For example, if the cancer has returned to a part of the body that has already been treated with radiation, it may not be possible to deliver more radiation to the same site. It depends on the amount of radiation that has been used before.

In other cases, radiation may be used in the same area of the body or in a different area. Some tumors don't respond as well to radiation, so radiation may not be used even if they recur. If you have cancer, your doctor may recommend radiation therapy. Uses high-energy beams to kill cancer cells.

Ionizing radiation has enough energy to dislodge electrons from atoms. This includes radiation used to treat cancer, radiation used in some types of medical imaging, radiation from natural radon gas, and radiation released by nuclear weapons and power plants. Examples of non-ionizing radiation include radio waves, light, microwave and radar. While these cancers most commonly occur in a wide variety of solid tissues, blood cancers can also arise after radiation therapy, he said.

Radiation therapy or radiation therapy is an important and integral component of cancer treatment, most of which confers a survival benefit. This type of radiation therapy occurs when radioactive material is placed in cancer or surrounding tissue. During external beam radiation therapy, the patient does not emit any radiation after treatment sessions. Specifically, it uses monoclonal antibodies, which are proteins that are attracted to very specific markers outside cancer cells, to deliver radiation directly to tumors.

After the planning process, the radiation therapy team decides what type of radiation and what dose you will receive based on the type and stage of the cancer, your general health, and treatment goals. Some radiation treatments (systemic radiation therapy) use radioactive substances that are given into a vein or by mouth. Nakamura also said that unlike cancers caused by UV radiation, cancers caused by radiation therapy did not have a remarkably large number of mutations. Because cancer cells have several mutations that cause the loss of this redundancy and, therefore, targeting DNA damage response pathways in cancer cells can induce cell death.

There are some steps you can take to manage your concerns if you are worried that you may have another type of cancer after radiation therapy. The cancer care team can answer specific questions about the type of radiation you were prescribed, how it affects your body, and any precautions that may be needed. However, it is not fully understood why certain people and tissues are susceptible to cancers caused by radiation. Most types of radiation therapy don't reach all parts of the body, which means they aren't useful for treating cancer that has spread to many parts of the body.

Researchers concluded that the young man's original cancer and second cancer were probably related to his p53 mutation. Radiation therapy uses high-energy particles or waves, such as x-rays, gamma rays, electron beams, or protons, to kill or damage cancer cells. .